Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education

and

Physician Assistant Program

Dr. Sanna Goyert, PH. D,
Professor and Chair of Microbiology and Immunology Department
at the City University of New York The Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education. Previously she was an Associate Professor of Medicine and Pathology at New York University School of Medicine and Director of the Laboratory of Innate Immunity at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at North Shore-LIJ Health Systems in Manhasset, New York.

She is an internationally renowned scientist studying innate mechanisms of defense against bacterial pathogens.
Dr. Goyert has published more than 100 research papers and book chapters and is a former recipient of the prestigious Stohlman Scholars award from the Leukemia Society of America. She has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the past 20 years. Her most notable accomplishment is the identification of a human gene known as CD14 that plays a prominent role in a disease called septic shock that kills more than 500,000 Americans annually. Dr. Goyert’s seminal work showed that mice genetically engineered to lack the CD14 gene are resistant to septic shock caused by E. coli. Dr. Goyert holds two major patents associated with her work on innate immunity that are currently licensed to several companies aiming to further the therapeutic potential of these discoveries. Dr. Goyert’s current work focuses on the host’s response to pathogens and includes studies aimed at the identification of additional genes and molecules that regulate the innate immune response by bacteria expressing specific virulence factors.


Recent publications:

1. Albers, U., A. Tiaden, T. Spirig, D. Al Alam, S. M. Goyert, S. C. Gangloff, and H. Hilbi. 2007. Expression of Legionella pneumophila paralogous lipid A biosynthesis genes under different growth conditions. Microbiology 153:3817-3829.

2. Metkar, S., S. Awasthi, E. Denamur, K. S. Kim, S. C. Gangloff, S. Teichberg, A. Haziot, J. Silver, and S. M. Goyert. 2007. Role of CD14 in responses to clinical isolates of Escherichia coli: effects of K1 capsule expression. Infect Immun. 75:5415-5424.

3. Kesteman, N., G. Vansanten, B. Pajak, S. M. Goyert, and M. Moser. 2008. Injection of lipopolysaccharide induces the migration of splenic neutrophils to the T cell area of the white pulp: role of CD14 and CXC chemokines. J Leukoc Biol. 83:640-647.

4. Komura, H., M. Miksa, R. Wu, S. M. Goyert, and P. Wang. 2009. Milk fat globule epidermal growth factor-factor VIII is down-regulated in sepsis via the lipopolysaccharide-CD14 pathway. J Immunol 182:581-587.

5. Miksa, M., P. Das, M. Zhou, R. Wu, W. Dong, Y. Ji, S. M. Goyert, T. S. Ravikumar, and P. Wang. 2009. Pivotal role of the alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor in producing inflammation and organ injury in a rat model of sepsis. PLoS One 4:e5504.

6. de Buhr, M. F., H. J. Hedrich, A. M. Westendorf, F. Obermeier, C. Hofmann, N. H. Zschemisch, J. Buer, D. Bumann, S. M. Goyert, and A. Bleich. 2009. Analysis of CD14 as a genetic modifier of experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in mice. Inflamm Bowel Dis 15:1824-1836.

 

Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology
* Office: H-207
* Telephone: (212) 650-6880
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: sgoyert@med.cuny.edu
Dr. Dani McBeth is Associate Dean of Student Affairs  and Associate Professor in the Department. He has been at the CUNY Medical School since 1986.

He teaches major portions of the basic microbiology and bacteriology portions of the Medical Microbiology and Immunology course for both medical students and physician’s assistants students.

As the Associate Dean of Student Affairs, he is currently very involved in the admissions process, in advising students on a variety of issues, in guiding students through the matching process to the final two years of medical school and what seems like a million other things.

Contact Information
Office of Student and Academic Affairs
* Office: H-113 
* Telephone: (212) 650-7727
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: dmcbeth@med.cuny.edu
 

 

 Dr. Viera Lima is a Course Director, Clinical Microbiologist and Bioinformatician, Laboratory Supervisor,  Departmental IT Head and Webmaster to Microbiology/Immunology,
AMSMIC, Pathology and Physician Assistant Program. She coordinates and teaches in HDIP and
participates in teaching and coordination of the Microbiology and Immunology Course in Physician Assistant Program at CUNY. General Jack of All Trades.

Research participation latest references:

Richard Coico, Elizabeth Kachur, Viera Lima, and Stanley Lipper: Guidelines for Pre-Clerkship Medical School Bioterrorism Curricula

Yan Wu, S. M. Tamma, V. Lima, and Richard Coico: Facilitated Antigen Presentation by B Cells Expressing IgD when Responding T Cells Express IgD-Receptors

Susan R. S. Gottesman, Viera Lima and Richard F. Coico: Expression of the Activation Marker (IgD-R) on Adult T Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL)

 

Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology
* Office: Suite H-14
* Telephone: (212) 650-7725
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: lima@med.cuny.edu
 

 

Dr. Linda Spatz Associate Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology is interested in understanding how anti-double stranded (anti-dsDNA) antibodies which are the hallmark of the autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), arise. Her laboratory is studying the regulation of anti-dsDNA B-cells. Normally these B cells are kept from secreting transgenic anti-ds DNA antibodies by regulatory mechanisms, collectively known as B cell tolerance. When one or more of these regulatory mechanisms goes awry, a breakdown in tolerance ensues and anti-dsDNA antibodies are secreted at elevated levels. These antibodies can deposit in various organs of the body including the skin, joints, and kidney where they can induce tissue damage. Dr. Spatz’s laboratory is investigating potential genetic and environmental factors that can lead to a breakdown in anti-dsDNA B cell tolerance. Using an anti-dsDNA transgenic mouse model she is currently studying how the overexpression of a B cell survival factor known as BAFF, can lead to the loss of B cell tolerance and the secretion of transgenic anti-dsDNA antibodies.

In addition, Dr. Spatz is working in collaboration with Dr. Paul Gottlieb to study the role of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) in the etiology of SLE. They have observed that immunization of mice with a major nuclear protein of EBV known as EBNA-1 can elicit the production of pathogenic anti-dsDNA antibodies that can deposit in the kidney. Future studies are addressing the mechanism by which EBNA-1 can elicit these anti-dsDNA antibodies.

Most recent publications:

Spatz, L., V. Saenko, A. Iliev, L. Jones, L. Geskin, and B. Diamond. 1997. Light chain usage in anti-dsDNA B cell subsets: Role in cell fate determination. J. Exp. Med 185: 1317-1326.

Bynoe, M.S., L. Spatz, and B. Diamond. 1999. Characterization of anti-DNA B cells that escape negative selection. Euro. J. Immunol. 29: 1304-1313.

Chu, Y.-P., D. Taylor, H-G., Yan, B. Diamond, and L. Spatz. 2002. Persistence of partially functional dsDNA binding B cells in mice transgenic for the heavy chain of an IgM anti-dsDNA antibody. Internat. Immunol. 14: 45-54.

Sundar, K., P. Gottlieb, S. Jacques, R. Villars, M-E. Benito, D. Taylor and L. Spatz. 2004. Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) in the mouse can elicit the production of anti-dsDNA antibodies.
J. Autoimmunity. 23; 127-140.

Taylor, D.K., E. Ito, M. Thorn, K. Sundar, T. Tedder, and L. Spatz, 2006. Loss of tolerance of anti-dsDNA B cells in mice overexpressing CD19. Mol. Immunol. 11; 1776-1790.

Thorn, M., Lewis, R., Kantrowitz, S., Mumbey-Wafula, A., and Spatz, L. 2010. BAFF overexpression promotes anti-dsDNA B cell maturation and antibody secretion. Cellular Immunol. 261; 9-22.

Yadav, P., Tran, H., Ebegbe, R., Gottlieb P., Wei, H., Mumbey-Wafula, A., Kaplan, A. Kholdarova, E., and Spatz, L. in revision. EBNA-1 protein can elicit antibodies that cross-react with dsDNA. PLos One.

Book Chapter:

Spatz, L. Tolerance and Autoimmunity. In Immunology, A Short Course, 6th Edition. 2009
R. Coico and G. Sunshine editors. John Wiley and Sons Inc., New York, NY

 

Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology
* Office: H-210b
* Telephone: (212) 650-7703
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: lspatz@med.cuny.edu
   
Dr. Paul Gottlieb’s group has established a research program that will yield insights into the Cystoviridae and viral relationships to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Dr. Gottlieb is Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology.

Dr. Gottlieb’s research group is studying and characterizing bacteriophage
f12, one of the newly identified members of the family Cystoviridae. These viruses contain a genome consisting of three segments of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Their mechanism of RNA packaging, replication and transcription is similar to that of the Reoviridae of which one member, rotavirus, is a major cause of infant gastroenteritis. To date, the cystoviruses are the only segmented dsRNA viruses that can be manipulated by recombinant genetic techniques, making them an excellent model for the study of the molecular biology of viruses of this type.

The laboratory has cloned and sequenced the three genomic segments and identified the viral genes.  This analysis has better defined the evolutionary relationships among the members of this virus family.  The genes of the virus have been expressed from the cDNA copies of the genome in E. coli and the viral proteins are now being studied, in particular the viral RNA-directed RNA polymerase P2. This study contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of viral RNA packaging and replication.

In a collaborative study with Dr. Spatz, the research group is investigating the role of the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) in the etiology of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). This research project focuses on characterizing the anti-double stranded DNA (dsDNA) response in mice that express the viral Epstein Barr Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1). The expression of this antigen in animals has been achieved through the use of DNA-based vaccination of recombinant plasmids. The establishment of this in vivo model enabled us to demonstrate that the inoculated mice produced antibodies to autoantigens associated with SLE.

Latest References:

Kainov, D. E., Mancini, E., Grimes, J. M., Stuart, D. I.,  H., Gottlieb, P.,  Wei, H., Tuma, R., Makeyev, E. V. and 
Bamford, D., (2003). Biochemical characterization, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies on the bacteriophage f 12 packing motor.

Yang, H., Gottlieb, P., Wei, H., Bamford, D., and Makeyev, E. V. (2003). Temperature requirements for the initiation of RNA-dependent RNA polymerization. Virology, in press.

Gottlieb, P., Potgieter, C., Wei, H., (2002). Characterization of F12, a Bacteriophage Related to F6: Nucleotide Sequence of the Large Double-Stranded RNA (dsRNA). Virology, 295 (1): 266-271.

 

Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology
* Office: H-210a
* Telephone: (212) 650-7709
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: pgottl@med.cuny.edu
 

 

Dr. Jack Silver Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology has worked extensively in the area of HLA (human histocompatability) antigens and how they determine susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis, regulate the human immune response, and form the basis for organ and tissue graft rejection. His other areas of expertise are in T cell differentiation markers and the genetics of susceptibility to Crohn's disease, an autoimmune disease of the gastrointestinal tract. He currently works with Dr. Sanna Goyert, Chair of Micobiology and Immunology, in understanding how the innate immune response is regulated and forms the first line of defense against invading micro-organisms. Dr. Silver has trained more than 30 postdoctoral fellows and graduate students who hold academic positions at various institutions around the world, including Harvard Medical School and Georgetown University Medical Center. He is a former "Established Investigator" of the American Heart Association, and his research has been funded by a variety of organizations including the American Cancer Society, the Multiple Sclerosis Society, the Arthritis Foundation, the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health, from which he received more than 20 consecutive years of funding. He is the author of more than 150 scientific articles, reviews, and book chapters.


Recent publications:

1. Zhou, Z., X. Y. Lin, P. N. Akolkar, B. Gulwani-Akolkar, J. Levine, S. Katz, and J. Silver. 2002. Variation at NOD2/CARD15 in familial and sporadic cases of Crohn's disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Am J Gastroenterol 97:3095-3101.

2. Silver, J. 2003. The importance of penetration. Inflamm Bowel Dis 9:341.

3. Ringheanu, M., F. Daum, J. Markowitz, J. Levine, S. Katz, X. Lin, and J. Silver. 2004. Effects of infliximab on apoptosis and reverse signaling of monocytes from healthy individuals and patients with Crohn's disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis 10:801-810.

 

Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology 
* Office: H-207 A
* Telephone: (212) 650-7728
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: 
Jsilvernyu@aol.com
Igor Toporovsky, MS Senior Laboratory Technician
Contact Information
Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology
* Telephone: (212) 650.6945
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail: toporovsky@med.cuny.edu
 

 

 

  Roberto Rodrigues, Assistant to Chair

Contact Information
The Department of Microbiology and Immunology
* Office: H-207
* Telephone: (212) 650-7729
* Fax: (212) 650-7797
* E-mail:
rrodrig1@med.cuny.edu
 

 

 
      

This page was last modified July 2013
Created by Dr. Viera Lima